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20 Jun 2019

How to Paint Around Windows

Tips & Tricks for Painting Around Windows

When it comes time to paint the house, painting around your old wood-framed windows is oftentimes the most tedious part of the entire project. Painting wooden windowpanes and frames can be time-consuming and is often a messy, frustrating experience if you aren’t slow and steady, or you haven’t taken the time to properly prep the area.

If painstakingly taping your windows with painter’s tape doesn’t appeal to you, there are a few different ways you can protect your windows while you paint the frames. The methods below are faster than using painter’s tape, work just as well, and best of all, they don’t leave behind any sticky adhesive!

Here are 4 clever hacks for painting around windows:painting around windows

1. Masking Liquid

Masking Liquid H2O, a painter’s best friend, is an acrylic-modified, water-based clear coating that peels off of glass once it’s dry. Masking Liquid is easy to use both indoors and outdoors. To use this product, simply brush the liquid onto the edges of the glass, give it some time to dry to a gel-like finish, and then start painting. Afterwards, the masking liquid can be peeled away easy enough. We recommend using the sharp edge of a razor blade to slice the gel away from the edge of the frame, and then the flat edge to scrape the gel off.

2. Lip Balm or Vaseline

If you don’t have any masking liquid lying around the garage, it’s no problem! Regular lip balm or Vaseline can be used instead. Using a cotton swab or your fingers, apply a generous coat of lip balm or a thin coat of Vaseline on the areas you wish to protect from paint.

Once the paint is dry, simply wash off the protective coating with a dry cloth and some window cleaner.  This method works exactly the same way as masking liquid at a fraction of the cost.

3. Wet Strips of Paper

Wet paper strips, cut carefully using a paper cutter or straight edge to make sure the lines are straight, are a genius way to protect glass when you’re painting around your windows. The wet paper sticks to the window just like tape but is easier to get into position and a lot easier to remove around into the perfect position.

Here’s how to do it: Take carefully cut strips of paper – regular copy paper is just fine – and dip them into a tray of water. Make sure the strips are saturated but not falling apart, remove the excess water, and then apply the strips on the glass you wish to protect. The wet paper sticks to the glass easily and can even be moved around until each strip is positioned just right.

Once applied, dry up any excess or dripping water from the windows and then simply paint around the window. Remove the paper strips once the paint around them is dry—these paper protectors will likely dry at the same rate as the paint colour.

Additional Tips for Painting Windows

  • Before using any of the methods above, thoroughly clean the windows and their frames of dust, debris, and spiderwebs.
  • Fully remove screens – paint drips on screens are difficult to clean.
  • Have cotton swabs and a damp rag on hand to clean any messes up as you go.
  • Use a paintbrush intended for cutting in and painting in closed quarters. A 1.5 inch stiff angled brush will help out a lot, as stiff bristles are more precise and don’t splay out.
  • Work from the center outwards if possible and aim to paint rails (horizontals) before stiles (verticals).
  • Remove any paint drips from glass windows once they are fully dry using a razor blade or specialized tool like the MaxCraft Stubby Scraper made exclusively for removing adhesives and dried paint.

Big or small, a painting project is often a chance to get a little up close and personal with your home’s walls and window frames. Sometimes setting out to give the place a fresh coat of paint leads to other renovation projects. If, as you’re prepping your windows for a paint job, you realize that you might be better off replacing your old windows with new vinyl windows, the team of glass specialists here at Budget Glass Nanaimo can help! Give us a call at (250) 758-3374 or schedule an appointment online.

10 Jun 2019
how to fix a sticky sliding glass door

Sliding Glass Doors Sticking?

How to Fix a Sticky Sliding Glass Door in 5 Easy Steps

Is your patio door doing a lot more sticking than sliding these days? If so, it’s likely time to show your patio door a little TLC. Fortunately, fixing a sliding glass door that sticks is usually inexpensive and can be completed in just a few simple steps.

The most common reasons your sliding patio door is sticking is because it’s either full of debris (think crumbs, pet hair, bugs, dust, and dirt) or it’s time for new rollers. Either way, you’ll need to start with removing the door to get a closer look at what you’re dealing with.

What You’ll Need to Fix Your Sliding Glass DoorSticky Outdoor Patio Doors

  • Vacuum Cleaner
  • Screwdriver
  • Soap, water & rag
  • Stiff bristled brush
  • Silicone-based lubricant
  • An extra set of hands

Step 1: Remove the Sliding Door

First thing’s first: find someone to help you remove the slider from its tracks. This keeps things safer for you, and for the door.

Next, locate the plastic adjustment screw covers on the sides of the door, near the bottom. Pry off or unscrew the covers, and then adjust the rollers using a screwdriver, so that they move away from the door.

This will allow you room to remove the door. Standing inside the house with the door in the middle of the opening, have your helper on the opposite side slowly tilt the top of the door toward you. You should be able to ease the door off its tracks almost effortlessly. If there isn’t enough clearance, adjust the top rollers higher.

Step 2: Vacuum the Tracks

With the door removed and safely placed to the side out of your way, thoroughly vacuum the sliding door’s tracks.

Step 3: Scrub the Sliding Door Tracks

Clean the freshly vacuumed tracks with hot, soapy water and a stiff-bristled brush. A toothbrush or wire brush, like the kind used for cleaning golf clubs, work well. Make sure to clean off the top and bottom of the door you’ve removed as well.

Consider vacuuming once again if there is still a lot of debris that has come loose in this process.

Also take a quick moment to check all weather stripping for loose or damaged areas. Trim or weather stripping that is not secured tightly could be causing minor friction.

Ensure tracks are dried thoroughly before the next step.

Step 4: Lubricate the Tracks

Lubricating the sliding door’s tracks is the next step. All it takes is the application of a thin coat of lubricant to the top and bottom of the door track. We also recommend applying a bit in the door frame where the glass door latches, for good measure. Make sure to clean up any overspray to avoid a slippery floor.

Use a non-stick silicone lubricant on vinyl door tracks. If you have wood tracks, opt for a hard wax such as candle wax or beeswax instead of spray lubricant. If you’re ever unsure or don’t have the right product on hand, there are specific door track lubricants available at your local hardware store. Avoid oil-based lubricants, as these tend to attract more dirt than anything else.

Step 5: Inspect and Reinstall the Slider Doorhow to fix a sticking sliding glass door

The final step is inspecting the sliding door’s rollers and hardware. If they appear to be cracked, wobbly, or dirty beyond cleaning, you can pop off the rollers and bring them with you to the hardware store to find replacement rollers.

To reinstall the slider door, bring back that extra set of hands you used to help you remove the door and simply pop the door back into place, then adjust the rollers once more with the screwdriver. Pay special attention to this adjustment. If there is too much tension, the doors will be stiff to open, and if there isn’t enough tension, your door will wobble loosely in the tracks.

Finally, slide the door back and forth a few times to test your work and also spread the lubricant evenly through the tracks.

Voila! Now the whole family will once again be able to open the patio door with ease.

It’s easy to ignore a sticky sliding door in the winter when you aren’t using your patio much, but when the weather starts to warm up and you’ll be using your slider more often, making sure it’s functioning properly will ease a lot of frustration around the house.

Professional Patio Door Replacement

There comes a point where a sliding glass door is beyond a good cleaning. If it feels like you’ve completed all of the steps above, but to no avail, it could be time to call your local glass shop for a sliding glass door repair or replacement. The professionals at Budget Glass in Nanaimo can help with your patio door repair and replacement needs. Learn more about our sliding glass door installation services, and then give us a call at (250) 758-3374 if you have any questions, or schedule an appointment online.