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20 Jun 2019

How to Paint Around Windows

Tips & Tricks for Painting Around Windows

When it comes time to paint the house, painting around your old wood-framed windows is oftentimes the most tedious part of the entire project. Painting wooden windowpanes and frames can be time-consuming and is often a messy, frustrating experience if you aren’t slow and steady, or you haven’t taken the time to properly prep the area.

If painstakingly taping your windows with painter’s tape doesn’t appeal to you, there are a few different ways you can protect your windows while you paint the frames. The methods below are faster than using painter’s tape, work just as well, and best of all, they don’t leave behind any sticky adhesive!

Here are 4 clever hacks for painting around windows:painting around windows

1. Masking Liquid

Masking Liquid H2O, a painter’s best friend, is an acrylic-modified, water-based clear coating that peels off of glass once it’s dry. Masking Liquid is easy to use both indoors and outdoors. To use this product, simply brush the liquid onto the edges of the glass, give it some time to dry to a gel-like finish, and then start painting. Afterwards, the masking liquid can be peeled away easy enough. We recommend using the sharp edge of a razor blade to slice the gel away from the edge of the frame, and then the flat edge to scrape the gel off.

2. Lip Balm or Vaseline

If you don’t have any masking liquid lying around the garage, it’s no problem! Regular lip balm or Vaseline can be used instead. Using a cotton swab or your fingers, apply a generous coat of lip balm or a thin coat of Vaseline on the areas you wish to protect from paint.

Once the paint is dry, simply wash off the protective coating with a dry cloth and some window cleaner.  This method works exactly the same way as masking liquid at a fraction of the cost.

3. Wet Strips of Paper

Wet paper strips, cut carefully using a paper cutter or straight edge to make sure the lines are straight, are a genius way to protect glass when you’re painting around your windows. The wet paper sticks to the window just like tape but is easier to get into position and a lot easier to remove around into the perfect position.

Here’s how to do it: Take carefully cut strips of paper – regular copy paper is just fine – and dip them into a tray of water. Make sure the strips are saturated but not falling apart, remove the excess water, and then apply the strips on the glass you wish to protect. The wet paper sticks to the glass easily and can even be moved around until each strip is positioned just right.

Once applied, dry up any excess or dripping water from the windows and then simply paint around the window. Remove the paper strips once the paint around them is dry—these paper protectors will likely dry at the same rate as the paint colour.

Additional Tips for Painting Windows

  • Before using any of the methods above, thoroughly clean the windows and their frames of dust, debris, and spiderwebs.
  • Fully remove screens – paint drips on screens are difficult to clean.
  • Have cotton swabs and a damp rag on hand to clean any messes up as you go.
  • Use a paintbrush intended for cutting in and painting in closed quarters. A 1.5 inch stiff angled brush will help out a lot, as stiff bristles are more precise and don’t splay out.
  • Work from the center outwards if possible and aim to paint rails (horizontals) before stiles (verticals).
  • Remove any paint drips from glass windows once they are fully dry using a razor blade or specialized tool like the MaxCraft Stubby Scraper made exclusively for removing adhesives and dried paint.

Big or small, a painting project is often a chance to get a little up close and personal with your home’s walls and window frames. Sometimes setting out to give the place a fresh coat of paint leads to other renovation projects. If, as you’re prepping your windows for a paint job, you realize that you might be better off replacing your old windows with new vinyl windows, the team of glass specialists here at Budget Glass Nanaimo can help! Give us a call at (250) 758-3374 or schedule an appointment online.

26 Apr 2017

Window Repair – 5 Common Window Issues

Window repair or new windows? We all love new things but sometimes we just can’t afford the “new” part. Budget Glass has helped hundreds of homeowners find solutions to fixing and repairing windows, which is often a less expensive alternative to planning a window renovation. By repairing your existing windows you can improve the energy efficiency of your home and get rid of those annoying problems like room drafts, clouded glass, sweaty window panes, and mold.

These window repair situations can introduce some pretty annoying features, so it’s no wonder homeowners we talk to sometimes say that they hate their windows. The entire appeal of having windows is based on them working properly and keeping out the cold. So when your windows aren’t opening and closing properly, the hinges are stiff, or no one wants to go near them, it’s time to consider making a change.

Here are 5 common window repair issues, and how we can help you fix them:

1. Rotting Window Frames: The worst case scenario is a rotten window frame that not only leaks air into your house but water too! If this hasn’t happened to you yet, you can avoid it by making sure that you have primed and painted your window frames and by minimized their exposure to water. If you do have signs of rot you can hire your local handy person to replace your window frames or use epoxy to patch them. Get a quote for repairs first, and we can provide you with a quote for replacement. You can decide which is a better option for your budget, as it might be less expensive to replace the window if the rotting is too advanced.

2. Stiff Window Parts: Having a window that doesn’t open and close without effort is annoying. The fix could be as simple as a thorough cleaning, and using some WD40 on your window hinges and clasps. Often windows in older homes have been painted shut at some point in time, so scraping off the old paint and starting fresh can make their function easier. Finding replacement parts for old windows can be a challenge, but we’re pretty good at it.

3. Drafty Windows: No one wants to sit near a window when it disrupts your feelings of being cozy. Having a drafty window is an indication that you might have a bigger problem such as rotting wood, but it can also be something as simple as caulking that has become cracked and peeling, or loose weather stripping. By sealing up the cracks around your windows you can reduce the drafts and also save some significant cash on your home energy costs.

4. Foggy Windows: All double or triple pane windows expand and contract with different temperature conditions over time. This puts pressure on the window seals, and eventually, these seals will break allowing air to enter between the layers of glass. Unfortunately, that also means that moisture can get in too, condensing where you can ‘t access it. Once a window seal is broken the foggy window syndrome begins. The warm weather fogs the inside of your windows so you can’t enjoy the view. We can give new life to your windows by replacing the sealed unit. That means that you can leave the window frame intact, and just replace the sealed unit. We’re happy to provide a free quote.

5. Broken Windows: The most obvious window problem is when it’s just plain broken (or maybe just chipped or cracked). If you have a single pane window in a wooden frame, we can supply sheets of glass to size so that your local handyman can replace the glass. If the window was in an aluminium or vinyl frame, it has to be carefully dismantled. Getting exact measurements is important so that you get the results you want. We’re happy to provide a quote for parts or repairs.

We love glass, and we want our customers to love it too! Making the most of your windows by keeping them in good repair ensures you’ll be enjoying the view and the warmth in any season. Call us for a free quote for your next window repair project.